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TOPSTORIES

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    Commuters who transfer between GO Transit and the TTC are about to get a $1.50 break on their fares, the Star has learned.

    The provincial government has agreed to subsidize a co-fare agreement that will allow riders who use both agencies on a single trip to avoid paying two full-price fares.

    Instead, adult passengers on GO Transit and the Union Pearson Express who transfer to the TTC will pay a half price TTC fare of $1.50.

    Going the other way, riders switching from the TTC to GO Transit or the Union Pearson Express will be discounted $1.50 on their fares.

    The discount will apply only to riders who pay using the Presto fare card.

    A regular adult TTC ride using Presto costs $3. Fares on GO Transit and the Union Pearson Express vary depending on the distance travelled.

    Premier Kathleen Wynne, Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca, and Toronto Mayor John Tory plan to announce the fare reduction on Friday morning.

    Del Duca told the Star on Tuesday night that the change is “fantastic news for the tens of thousands of people across the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area that transfer ... for their daily commutes.”

    “These commuters will now not only enjoy enhanced service across the GO network, but also a substantial savings for choosing to take transit to get around the GTHA,” the minister said.

    Subsidizing the discount will cost the provincial treasury $18 million a year, and will affect 50,000 daily commuters who take the TTC and GO Transit or the UP Express.

    For average commuters, it could mean a savings of $720 a year.

    The change will be put in place to coincide with the opening of the Spadina subway extension to Vaughan, which will be the first TTC subway to cross municipal boundaries and will intersect with GO Transit service.

    The extension is scheduled to open on December 17, and once it’s in operation more GO Transit users are expected to be hopping aboard the TTC as part of their daily commute.

    The subsidy is consistent with Wynne’s plan to reduce gridlock by encouraging motorists to take public transit. At the same time, with an election set for June 7, 2018, it should be politically helpful to the governing Liberals, who hold most of the seats in the Greater Toronto Area.

    Contacted about the arrangement, a spokesperson for Mayor John Tory said it’s “a step in the right direction” toward the SmartTrack project. Tory promised during the election campaign that under his SmartTrack plan, transit riders would be able to board at GO stations within Toronto at the same price as taking the TTC.

    “This is the first step in fare integration, not the only step and not the end of the story, but a great beginning,” wrote Don Peat in an email.

    “The TTC's budget is protected and will not be negatively impacted. Ultimately, this agreement will mean if you ride a mix of the TTC, UP Express and GO to get around Toronto, transit will now be less expensive."

    Spokespeople for the TTC and Metrolinx, the provincial agency that operates GO Transit, declined to comment.

    GO Transit already has co-fare agreements with all other local transit agencies in the 905, but until this week’s announcement it lacked one with the TTC, which is by far the biggest transit operator in the region.

    Forcing riders who use both TTC and GO Transit to pay a double fare has been seen as a significant disincentive to more people taking public transit.

    Metrolinx, which is also responsible for transportation planning in the GTHA, has initiated a study of fare integration, with the ultimate goal of standardizing fare structures of all the agencies in the region and allowing passengers a “seamless” transit trip across municipal boundaries.

    A report presented to the agency’s board last month determined a new regionwide fare system would require changes to transit governance and funding models however, which are likely to be controversial and take years to implement.

    The report recommended less contentious measures in the short-term as part of a “step-by-step approach” to reduce barriers to transit use across municipal boundaries.

    They included creating a co-fare between the TTC and GO Transit, advice that the province appears to have followed.

    Other proposed measures were discounts for trips between the TTC and 905 transit agencies, and adjustments to GO’s fare structure.


    GO Transit users to get half-price fares on TTCGO Transit users to get half-price fares on TTC

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    Canada’s housing agency is consulting an unlikely ally in a bid to boost the stock of affordable rental housing: Airbnb.

    The head of Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, the company that’s mandated to help house Canadians, said Tuesday that Airbnb and other short-term rental companies like Vacation Rentals By Owners (VRBO) could help “spawn supply” of rental housing in the country.

    “I think VRBO and Airbnb should get ahead of this, because they could be giving us some social utility,” the corporation’s CEO Evan Siddall told The Canadian Press.

    Siddall said he opened up a conversation with Airbnb about potentially turning their large supply of short-term rentals into longer term rental homes, although he said it’s too soon to determine the details of how the platform could help with affordable housing.

    Toronto critics admonished the housing authority for looking to Airbnb for affordable housing help, which they see as a culprit in housing supply shortages — not a lifeline.

    It’s like “the hens getting together to ask the fox to guard the henhouse,” said Thorben Wieditz, a researcher with the hospitality worker union Unite Here Local 75, and a founding member of Fairbnb, a coalition that advocates for stricter rules for short-term rental companies.

    Wieditz has heard arguments before that Airbnb and its competitors could help encourage homeowners to create legal “secondary suites” like basement apartments that would, in the long term, create greater long-term rental supply.

    Wieditz doesn’t buy it though.

    “If the market is such that you can make much more on short-term rentals, there’s no way that these units will go back to the long-term rental market,” he said.

    Lisa Marion, a Toronto Airbnb host who runs a company that helps others set up units for short-term rentals, said the hosts she knows don’t typically have long-term plans to put their spaces on the rental market.

    “People Airbnb their units because the cost to buy them was so high they need to make that money back,” Marion said. “The units being rented out would never be considered ‘affordable housing’ even if they were back in the pool.”

    Audrey-Anne Coulombe, a spokesperson with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation said Siddall had a “high level conversation” with Airbnb executives, but has no plans for a partnership.

    “CMHC . . . is always open to exploring innovative approaches to helping Canadians meet their housing needs,” Coulombe said.

    She said Siddall was not available for an interview Tuesday.

    Airbnb says its hosts typically share their homes on average up to 60 nights per year, earning themselves about $4,000 — figures that the company suggests aren’t high enough to support the idea that it is squeezing units out of the long-term rental market.

    A McGill university study by urban planners showed 3,200 properties listed on the site in 2016 weren’t “principal residences” — meaning the people renting those spaces didn’t live there. The implication is that some or all of those units could have helped dilute the strained long-term rental market, had they not been listed on Airbnb.

    “We take the issue of affordable housing seriously and that is why we are collaborating with communities and organizations across Canada, sharing comprehensive data and detailed information about our community,” Airbnb spokesperson Lindsey Scully told The Canadian Press.

    The authors of the McGill study argued Airbnb could have a negative impact on rental prices.

    “We’re not even close to the situation where there’s enough supply of rental housing to meet demand and when you’re in those very, very constrained situations, then even just a couple thousand units getting pulled off the market by Airbnb can have a really major impact on prices,” said lead researcher David Wachsmuth.

    Scully did not reply to the Star’s requests for comment Tuesday.

    With files from The Canadian Press


    National housing agency looks to Airbnb for help to boost number of affordable unitsNational housing agency looks to Airbnb for help to boost number of affordable units

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    Decision day is at hand for the Bloor St. bike lanes.

    In a highly-anticipated report expected to be published next week, city staff will reveal the results of the year-long pilot project of separated bicycle lanes on the major downtown thoroughfare.

    The report to the public works committee will recommend whether to make the lanes permanent, ahead of a council vote next month that’s expected to be closer than the 38-3 decision that approved the lanes on a trial basis.

    That initial May 2016 vote was one-sided in part because Mayor John Tory threw his support behind the project. But Tory was clear at the time if the pilot data didn’t support the project “then I will be advocating it be taken out.”

    A spokesperson for the mayor said Tuesday that Tory remains undecided.

    “From the very beginning, the mayor has made it clear he wants staff to rigorously monitor these lanes and he would wait until all the studies were complete before deciding whether to support making them permanent,” Don Peat wrote in an email.

    “The mayor is going about making this decision in a responsible way.”

    Whether Tory supports keeping the lanes could prove a defining moment for his mayoralty. Over nearly three yearsas mayor, Tory has championed progressive transportation causes like an ambitious 10-year cycling plan, and a “Vision Zero” road safety strategy aimed at eliminating bicycle and pedestrian injuries.

    But he has also made campaigns to keep car traffic unencumbered a hallmark of his administration. And should he support making the Bloor lanes permanent, Doug Ford, the former suburban councillor currently considered Tory’s main rival in next year’s election, can be expected to use it as political cudgel.

    Jared Kolb, executive director of advocacy group Cycle Toronto, argued that Tory can’t credibly claim to advocate for initiatives like the road safety plan if he doesn’t support keeping the Bloor lanes.

    “I don’t think that a city that’s committed to Vision Zero and eliminating serious injuries and fatalities on our streets can seriously endorse and stand behind that plan if it is ripping out bike lanes,” he said.

    The data released next week will include statistics on traffic flow, cycling volumes, public perception and economic impact.

    Cycling advocates argue that the most important metric is whether the Bloor lanes have made the street safer.

    The report will include limited information on collisions, but preliminary data the city has already released showed 85 per cent of cyclists surveyed said the lanes made them feel safer.

    Data the city collected last fall weeks after the lanes were installed showed 4,500 riders used the route every day, a 36 per cent increase compared to before the lanes went in.

    The bikeway caused a significant increase in travel time for drivers, however, with delays of up to eight minutes and 30 seconds in the evening rush hour. The volume of cars on Bloor decreased 22 per cent, to 20,000 per day.

    The numbers in the new report are expected to be more favourable to the bike lanes. City hall insiders say cycling counts have risen since last year, and delays to drivers have been reduced thanks to signal timing and signage changes.

    One obstacle to keeping the lanes could be concerns raised by some local business owners. The preliminary city data showed businesses were “roughly split” on the bike lanes, with 44 per cent in favour and 53 per cent opposed.

    Barry Alper, who co-owns the Fresh restaurant chain, said revenues at his Bloor and Spadina Ave. location are down five per cent, while business at his other three locations in Toronto has increased. Other business owners told the Star they’ve seen sales decrease between 16 and 40 per cent.

    “If the bike lanes stay, then we’re going to have to sit down and figure out what the future of our bakery is. And it breaks my heart,” said Suki Lee, whose family has owned the Hodo Kwaja bakery near Manning Ave. for 25 years.

    Many owners say reduced parking is the problem — the city removed 166 of about 280 on-street paid parking spaces to accommodate the lanes.

    But while Alper and Lee said they’d like the city to consider modifications to the bike lanes to provide easier access to drivers, both stressed that they support cycling infrastructure in the neighbourhood.

    “If my choice is no bike lanes or these bike lanes I choose and support these bike lanes. No question,” Alper said.

    Councillor Joe Cressy, whose ward is one of two straddled by the 2.6-kilometre project area, is a vocal supporter of the lanes, but he said he believed they could be improved by some “minor changes.”

    He has proposed creating time-specific accessible parking spaces to accommodate people with mobility issues, and also suggests modifying the design to enable easier loading for businesses.

    But he believes the city report will reflect that the lanes are already a success, and argued that council would be unwise to remove them.

    “What I expect it will say and show is that Bloor St. is moving people more safely, and it’s moving more cyclists,” he said.

    “Twenty-first century cities don’t tear out bike lanes. They build more of them.”


    Decision day is at hand for the Bloor St. bike lanes. Will the mayor advocate for their removal?Decision day is at hand for the Bloor St. bike lanes. Will the mayor advocate for their removal?

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    WASHINGTON—He accused Puerto Ricans of throwing the federal budget “out of whack.”

    He suggested Puerto Rico had not experienced a “real catastrophe” like Hurricane Katrina, since a mere “16 people” had been confirmed dead.

    He told a family of hurricane victims to “have a good time.”

    He tossed paper towels to another group of victims, in a church, as if he was shooting basketball free throws.

    He told a third group of victims that they don’t need flashlights any longer, though 90 per cent of the island was still without power.

    He refused to speak to the mayor of San Juan.

    And, as usual, Donald Trump congratulated himself.

    Facing withering criticism for his delayed and then belligerent response to the Puerto Rican hurricane crisis, Trump’s Tuesday visit to San Juan was a chance to begin to repair the wounds he had caused over a week of tweeted insults.

    Instead he casually tore them open, a smile on his face.

    In a frequently abnormal afternoon on the island, Trump showed none of the scripted gravitas of his sombre Monday response to the massacre in Las Vegas. Speaking without notes, he behaved as if the ongoing crisis had long since been fixed by his own doing.

    It was vintage Trump — informal, freewheeling, self-centred, detached from facts, wholly unlike the behaviour of any other modern president.

    His supporters applauded again, pointing to his authenticity and moments of empathy. Puerto Ricans already upset with him before he landed were infuriated.

    “He takes two weeks to visit a disaster zone where 3.5 million American citizens live. He arrives with a smile on his face, makes fun of the situation, shows no empathy, lies and lies on camera as he does 24-7. And then throws paper towel rolls to people in need as if he was playing Go Fetch with dogs,” said Joel Isaac, 27, a New York actor who moved from Puerto Rico three years ago.

    Most of Isaac’s family is still on the island. He said he had never felt humiliated as a Puerto Rican until he watched Trump’s visit.

    “It’s the whole scene where the privileged white man comes to save the brown peasants after they’ve been begging, thirsty and hungry. It’s super disgusting to see, honestly,” he said.

    Trump began the day with a traditional kind of crisis event: a roundtable briefing with members of his Cabinet and Puerto Rican and military leaders. His presence and his response were applauded by Puerto Rican Gov. Ricardo Rossello.

    “I want to personally thank you, Mr. President, because over the course of the past week you have called essentially every day to make sure we have what we need, to make sure that the resources are over here,” Rossello said.

    Trump, however, did nothing at the briefing to dispel criticism that he is not sincerely concerned about Puerto Ricans. In meandering remarks, he boasted about the F-35 warplanes the government is planning to procure, complimented pro-wrestling titan Vince McMahon, and again grumbled about the cost of the rebuilding effort — this time suggesting Puerto Ricans themselves were at fault.

    “Now, I hate to tell you, Puerto Rico, but you’ve thrown our budget a little out of whack,” he said. “Because we’ve spent a lot of money on Puerto Rico. And that’s fine. We’ve saved a lot of lives.”

    Then he mused that Maria was different than “a real catastrophe like Katrina,” in which more than 1,800 people died.

    “Sixteen people versus in the thousands. You can be very proud of all of your people, all of our people working together. Sixteen versus literally thousands of people,” he said. “You can be very proud. Everybody around this table and everybody watching can really be very proud of what’s taken place in Puerto Rico.”

    The official death toll was increased Tuesday evening to 34 from the previous total of 16.

    A reporter for San Juan’s Center for Investigative Journalism found that at least dozens more were dead.

    Jeremy Konyndyk, chief of foreign disaster assistance under Barack Obama, wrote on Twitter: “THIS IS APPALLING. This is such a deeply wrong, deeply inappropriate, deeply disrespectful thing to say....that I hardly know where to start.”

    Trump proceeded to a chapel, where he handed out bags of rice. In the manner of a basketball player, he also tossed up several packages of paper towel.

    The pool reporter on scene said the crowd “enjoyed” Trump’s NBA impression. Other Puerto Ricans found the display disrespectful.

    “Does he think this is a show? A game? The first reaction that I had: why is he throwing things to Puerto Ricans like we’re animals?” said Frances Alvarado, 55, a Puerto Rican in North Carolina whose husband has spent three decades in the navy. Of Trump’s performance as a whole, she said, “It’s shameful. It’s degrading. It’s insulting.”

    Trump shook the hand of San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulin Cruz, whom he has repeatedly disparaged as a poor leader and a Democratic partisan. Yulin Cruz said she told him, “This is about saving lives. It’s not about politics.”

    Trump didn’t respond, “then pointedly ignored her,” NBC’s Andrea Mitchell reported.

    As Trump’s motorcade passed, a lone protester held up a sign reading “You are a bad hombre.” He was greeted politely by the families he encountered on a brief neighbourhood walking tour, listening to one tell him about how they had been trapped in their house.

    Trump ended the visit with some additional applause for himself.

    “I think it meant a lot to the people of Puerto Rico that I was there. They really responded very nicely. And I guess it’s one of the few times anybody has done this. From what I am hearing it’s the first time that a sitting president has done something like this,” he said.


    Donald Trump compares Puerto Rico to ‘a real catastrophe like Katrina’ — and congratulates himself: AnalysisDonald Trump compares Puerto Rico to ‘a real catastrophe like Katrina’ — and congratulates himself: AnalysisDonald Trump compares Puerto Rico to ‘a real catastrophe like Katrina’ — and congratulates himself: AnalysisDonald Trump compares Puerto Rico to ‘a real catastrophe like Katrina’ — and congratulates himself: AnalysisDonald Trump compares Puerto Rico to ‘a real catastrophe like Katrina’ — and congratulates himself: AnalysisDonald Trump compares Puerto Rico to ‘a real catastrophe like Katrina’ — and congratulates himself: Analysis

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    LAS VEGAS—The Las Vegas gunman’s girlfriend, back in the United States after a weeks-long trip abroad, will be at the centre of the investigation into the shooting deaths of 59 people as authorities try to determine why a man with no known record of violence or crime would open fire on a concert crowd from a high-rise hotel.

    Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend Marilou Danley, 62, who was in the Philippines at the time of the shooting, was met by FBI agents at the airport in Los Angeles late Tuesday night, according to a law enforcement official.

    The official wasn’t authorized to publicly discuss the matter and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

    Sheriff Joseph Lombardo, who has called Danley a “person of interest” in the attack, said that “we anticipate some information from her shortly,” and said he is “absolutely” confident authorities will find out what set off Paddock, a 64-year-old high-stakes gambler and retired accountant who killed himself before police stormed his 32nd-floor room.

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    Danley first arrived in the Philippines on Sept. 15, according to immigration documents there. She departed on Sept. 22 then returned three days later on a flight from Hong Kong. She was travelling on an Australian passport.

    Philippines immigration bureau spokeswoman Antonette Mangrobang said authorities there had been working with U.S. officials.

    “From the very beginning, we have been providing them necessary information that would aid their investigation,” Mangrobang said.

    Danley’s Australia-based sisters say they believe Paddock sent her away so she wouldn’t interfere with his plans.

    Australia’s Channel 7 TV network interviewed the sisters with their faces obscured and their names withheld. They said they believe their sister couldn’t have known about his ideas.

    The woman said Danley is “a good person” who would’ve stopped Paddock had she been there.

    One of the sisters, who live near Brisbane, Queensland, said they believed Marilou knew Paddock had guns, but not as many as he had.

    “She probably was even (more) shocked than us because she is more closer to him than us,” her sister said.

    Paddock transferred $100,000 to the Philippines in the days before the shooting, a U.S. official briefed by law enforcement but not authorized to speak publicly because of the continuing investigation told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

    Investigators are still trying to trace that money and also looking into a least a dozen financial reports over the past several weeks that said Paddock gambled more than $10,000 per day, the official said.

    Paddock met Danley several years ago while she was working as a high-limit hostess for Club Paradise at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa in Reno, Nevada, said his brother Eric.

    “They were adorable — big man, tiny woman. He loved her. He doted on her,” Eric said.

    Employees at a Starbucks in Mesquite, Nevada, however, described the couple’s relationship differently. A supervisor at the coffee shop told the Los Angeles Times that Paddock often berated Danley in public. The Starbucks is the only one in the town of Mesquite and is inside the Virgin River Casino.

    “It happened a lot,” Esperanza Mendoza, supervisor of the Starbucks, told the Times. He would verbally abuse her when Danley asked to use his casino card to buy food or other things inside the casino, Esperanza said.

    “He would glare down at her and say — with a mean attitude — ‘You don’t need my casino card for this. I’m paying for your drink, just like I’m paying for you.’ Then she would softly say, ‘OK’ and step back behind him. He was so rude to her in front of us.”

    As for what may have set Paddock off, retired FBI profiler Jim Clemente speculated that there was “some sort of major trigger in his life — a great loss, a breakup, or maybe he just found out he has a terminal disease.”

    Clemente said a “psychological autopsy” may be necessary to try to establish the motive. If the suicide didn’t destroy Paddock’s brain, experts may even find a neurological disorder or malformation, he said.

    He said there could be a genetic component to the slaughter: Paddock’s father was a bank robber who was on the FBI’s most-wanted list in the 1960s and was diagnosed a psychopath.

    “The genetics load the gun, personality and psychology aim it, and experiences pull the trigger, typically,” Clemente said.

    Paddock had a business degree from Cal State Northridge. In the 1970s and ‘80s, he worked as a mail carrier and an IRS agent and held down a job in an auditing division of the Defence Department, according to the government. He later worked for a defence contractor.

    He had no known criminal record, and public records showed no signs of financial troubles.

    Nevada’s Gaming Control Board said it will pass along records compiled on Paddock and his girlfriend to investigators.

    His brother, Eric Paddock, said he was at a loss to explain the massacre.

    “No affiliation, no religion, no politics. He never cared about any of that stuff,” he said outside his Florida home.

    Eric Paddock said his brother did show a confrontational side at times: He apparently hated cigarette smoke so much that he carried around a cigar and blew smoke in people’s faces when they lit up around him.

    Lombardo said the investigation is proceeding cautiously in case criminal charges are warranted against someone else.

    “This investigation is not ended with the demise of Mr. Paddock,” the sheriff said. “Did this person get radicalized unbeknownst to us? And we want to identify that source.”

    On Wednesday, President Donald Trump is set to arrive in Las Vegas to meet with public officials, first responders and some of the 527 people injured in the attack. At least 45 patients at two hospitals remained in critical condition.

    All but three of the dead had been identified by Tuesday afternoon, Lombardo said.

    Some investigators turned their focus Tuesday from the shooter’s perch to the festival grounds where his victims fell.

    A dozen investigators, most in FBI jackets and all wearing blue booties to avoid contaminating the scene, documented evidence at the site where gunfire rained down and country music gave way to screams of pain and terror.

    “Shoes, baby strollers, chairs, sunglasses, purses. The whole field was just littered with things,” said Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt after touring the site Monday. “There were bloodstains everywhere.”

    While Paddock’s motive has proved elusive, investigators have found no shortage of evidence of how Paddock carried out the elaborate attack.

    He planned the massacre so meticulously that he even set up cameras inside the peephole of his high-rise hotel room and on a service cart outside his door, apparently to spot anyone coming for him, authorities said.

    Investigators also found a computer and 23 guns with him at the hotel, along with 12 “bump stock” devices that can enable a rifle to fire continuously, like an automatic weapon, authorities said. Nineteen more guns were found at Paddock’s Mesquite home and seven at his Reno house.

    Authorities released police body camera video that showed the chaos of the attack as officers tried to figure out the location of the shooter and shuttle people to safety. Amid sirens and volleys of gunfire, people yelled “they’re shooting right at us” while officers shouted “go that way!”

    Clark County Undersheriff Kevin McMahill said the shooting spanned between nine and 11 minutes.

    The cameras Paddock set up at the Mandalay Bay hotel casino were part of his extensive preparations that included stockpiling nearly two dozen guns in his room before opening fire on the concert below. McMahill said the cameras included one in the peephole and two in the hallway.

    “I anticipate he was looking for anybody coming to take him into custody,” Lombardo said.

    During the Sunday night rampage, a hotel security guard who approached the room was shot through the door and wounded in the leg.

    “The fact that he had the type of weaponry and amount of weaponry in that room, it was preplanned extensively,” the sheriff said, “and I’m pretty sure he evaluated everything that he did and his actions, which is troublesome.”

    With files from the Washington Post


    Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioningLas Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock’s girlfriend returns to U.S. for questioning

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    An obscure but controversial tax break is a sweet deal for doctors, but unsavoury for the rest of us.

    Doctors deserve a better deal, not tax dodges: CohnDoctors deserve a better deal, not tax dodges: Cohn

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    Maple Leaf Gardens employee Gordon Stuckless snuck boys into hockey games and told them he loved them, court heard Wednesday.

    New trial begins for latest allegations against Maple Leaf Gardens sex abuser Gordon StucklessNew trial begins for latest allegations against Maple Leaf Gardens sex abuser Gordon Stuckless

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    A new study says that a major reason teens are sleepy and moody is because they go to school too early in the morning.

    Are teenagers really lazy and moody? Or is the schedule we impose on them deeply flawed?: TeitelAre teenagers really lazy and moody? Or is the schedule we impose on them deeply flawed?: Teitel

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    Former students of RH King Academy have reunited for 70 years.

    These women graduated from their Toronto high school in 1947 and they're still close friends todayThese women graduated from their Toronto high school in 1947 and they're still close friends todayThese women graduated from their Toronto high school in 1947 and they're still close friends todayThese women graduated from their Toronto high school in 1947 and they're still close friends todayThese women graduated from their Toronto high school in 1947 and they're still close friends todayThese women graduated from their Toronto high school in 1947 and they're still close friends today

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    The Calgary-based TransCanada made the announcement via a statement released Thursday morning.

    TransCanada ends bid to build Energy East pipeline after ‘careful review of changed circumstances’TransCanada ends bid to build Energy East pipeline after ‘careful review of changed circumstances’

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    The first incident happened just after 11 p.m. Wednesday at York Mills and Don Mills Rds. About four hours later, two more pedestrians were struck in the Yonge and Lawrence area.

    One dead, two injured after two collisions in five hour span on Toronto streetsOne dead, two injured after two collisions in five hour span on Toronto streets

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    As president, Barack Obama prosecuted more than twice as many whistleblowers as all previous administrations combined — stifling a vital source of information about state practices shrouded in a veil of secrecy.

    The dangerous hypocrisy of celebrating Obama while criminalizing Manning: KanjiThe dangerous hypocrisy of celebrating Obama while criminalizing Manning: KanjiThe dangerous hypocrisy of celebrating Obama while criminalizing Manning: KanjiThe dangerous hypocrisy of celebrating Obama while criminalizing Manning: Kanji

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    RCMP Sergeant Mitch Fox looked out for 23-year-old Jordan McIldoon’s nana, a “wee Scottish woman,” while McIldoon’s parents flew to Nevada to bring their son’s body home.

    They lost their only son in the Las Vegas attack, now the McIldoon family of B.C. is finding support from Vancouver to VegasThey lost their only son in the Las Vegas attack, now the McIldoon family of B.C. is finding support from Vancouver to VegasThey lost their only son in the Las Vegas attack, now the McIldoon family of B.C. is finding support from Vancouver to VegasThey lost their only son in the Las Vegas attack, now the McIldoon family of B.C. is finding support from Vancouver to Vegas

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    Landing a Google company to build a ‘smart’ neighhbourhood would boost city’s push to become centre of innovation.

    Google firm poised to partner on Toronto high-tech neighbourhoodGoogle firm poised to partner on Toronto high-tech neighbourhood

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    They’re racing to take the next step in Toronto, in Winniepg, in Edmonton and Calgary.

    One game for Leafs, but what a game: ArthurOne game for Leafs, but what a game: ArthurOne game for Leafs, but what a game: ArthurOne game for Leafs, but what a game: ArthurOne game for Leafs, but what a game: ArthurOne game for Leafs, but what a game: Arthur

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    City council rejected the plan to rename Centennial Park Stadium in Etobicoke after the late Rob Ford by a vote of 11-24.

    No ‘Rob Ford Memorial Stadium’ in Toronto after council rejects renaming proposalNo ‘Rob Ford Memorial Stadium’ in Toronto after council rejects renaming proposal

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    Jason and Jodi Chapnik, who live in a multi-million dollar home on Strathearn Rd., filed a lawsuit against their neighbours for remodeling a nearby property on Vesta Dr. to look “strikingly similar” to their house.

    This Forest Hill couple sued their neighbours for $2.5 million over a house renovated to look like theirsThis Forest Hill couple sued their neighbours for $2.5 million over a house renovated to look like theirs

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    Low-wage migrant farmworkers are a crucial and growing part of Canada’s economy. Yet in most cases it’s impossible for them to get permanents status, which experts say leaves them vulnerable to exploitation.

    He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’He's worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’

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    The family of a missing 38-year-old Markham man is pleading for his return and scouring Algonquin Park, his last known location.

    Eugene Kim was last seen around 7 a.m. Monday when he dropped off his children, aged 2 and 6, off at school.

    His brother-in-law Scott Lim said Kim told his wife, Christine, that he had an important business meeting at work to close a deal and that he’d be home late. Kim works a sales representative, responsible for selling corporate wireless solutions.

    At around 9 p.m. that night, his wife received a text message from him saying that he got the deal and would be home in an hour. More than two hours later, Kim texted his wife again to say he couldn’t talk right now, Lim said.

    The texts were traced to a phone tower in the North Bay area close to Algonquin Park.

    Lim said the disappearance is completely out of character for Kim, who has a regular morning routine that includes getting the kids ready for school and dropping them off.

    “It just doesn’t add up that he wouldn’t check in with his family for three days,” Lim said. “This is completely out of the ordinary for Eugene Kim.”

    Kim was last seen driving a black 2010 Nissan Rogue with the licence plate BJJD 108.

    Lim said his brother-in-law has no history of mental illness, no health problems, no addictions they’re aware of and no connections to people known to police.

    Kim, who works for a wireless company, called in sick to work Monday. Lim said his employer didn’t know about the business deal Kim had told his family about.

    Lim also said Kim bought a one-night camping permit for Algonquin Park at Voyager Outfitters on Monday afternoon. The family reported Kim missing Wednesday and has been searching the area with the help of park rangers Wednesday and Thursday. So far, they’ve come up empty handed, Lim said.

    “We’re trying to go through every crack and crevice and see if he’s hiding somewhere,” Lim said.

    He said police have told him there’s no indication of foul play, but the family is concerned because the move is completely out of character for Kim.

    York Region police Const. Laura Nicolle said they’re working with the Ontario Provincial Police to find a last known location for Kim.

    She also said they’ve received tips about Kim’s whereabouts, including one that suggested he wasn’t alone in his vehicle when he was near the park, but they haven’t been able to confirm it yet.

    Anyone with information is asked to contact York Regional Police 2 Division, or leave an anonymous tip with Crime Stoppers by calling 1-800-222-TIPS.


    Family searching for missing Markham man in Algonquin ParkFamily searching for missing Markham man in Algonquin Park

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    A chemical leak at a North York recycling facility has left four injured and forced dozens more to undergo decontamination procedures after the exposure.

    The leak of an as-yet unidentified substance was found early Friday at Canada Fibers Ltd., a recycling plant near Arrow Rd. and Sheppard Ave.

    “Some material on the line started to disperse a noxious substance,” said Toronto Fire District Chief Stephan Powell, elaborating that it was a minor irritant. “People started to have some trouble breathing.”

    Toronto paramedics and firefighters worked to treat upwards of 60 workers for the chemical exposure. Four were treated for minor injuries, with two transported to hospital.

    Toronto Fire set up two decontamination sites — one to decontaminate workers, and another to aide firefighters in determining the leaked substance.

    “We scoured the plant; we took air quality readings and decided we are going to keep the people out of the work area of the plant,” said Powell.

    Fire officials have not yet found the source of the leak.

    MORE ON THESTAR.COM

    Recycling plant Canada Fibres Ltd. ordered to pay $1.33M in fines, back wages

    Suspected human remains found at North York recycling plant

    With files from The Canadian Press


    Four injured, 60 treated after chemical leak at North York recycling plantFour injured, 60 treated after chemical leak at North York recycling plant

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