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    The federal government announces $800 million in compensation for Indigenous peoples taken from their homes as infants and raised by non-Indigenous families.

    Survivors of ’60s Scoop share stories of loss as Ottawa announces compensationSurvivors of ’60s Scoop share stories of loss as Ottawa announces compensation

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    Premier Kathleen Wynne says it was ‘never the intention’ that such activities would be given credit.

    Catholic school students earn volunteer hours for anti-abortion activitiesCatholic school students earn volunteer hours for anti-abortion activities

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    The strong comments come two weeks after Jerry Jones knelt with the team during the U.S. anthem ahead of a game.

    Cowboys owner Jerry Jones draws sharp response over threat to bench players who ‘disrespect’ the flagCowboys owner Jerry Jones draws sharp response over threat to bench players who ‘disrespect’ the flag

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    Yahya Abdirahman Jama, 20, and Zayd Q. Chaudhry, 19, have been charged with first-degree murder in the death of 29-year-old Abdulkadir Bihi.

    Two murder suspects in Etobicoke shooting turn themselves inTwo murder suspects in Etobicoke shooting turn themselves in

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    CMHC found about three-quarters of Vancouver’s price gains were tied to fundamentals, versus 40 per cent in Toronto.

    ‘Puzzling’ Toronto real estate market could frustrate push for price fix, CMHC says‘Puzzling’ Toronto real estate market could frustrate push for price fix, CMHC says

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    The Uggs brand name in the U.S. is owned by a company based in California. It sued an Australian shoemaker last year.

    What’s in an Ugg? Court battle brews over boots brand nameWhat’s in an Ugg? Court battle brews over boots brand name

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    Tom Dedes, 50, died nine days after he was pinned by a workcar in the TTC's McCowan Yard.

    TTC worker dies of injuries after McCowan accidentTTC worker dies of injuries after McCowan accident

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    “We’re trying to show that when we have the information, we’re going to pursue the people providing this because it’s causing death in our communities,” says South Simcoe police Det. Sgt. Brad Reynolds.

    Alleged fentanyl dealers across Canada increasingly facing manslaughter chargesAlleged fentanyl dealers across Canada increasingly facing manslaughter charges

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    Stephanie Hookimaw said relatives in Attawapiskat are still struggling to come to grips with what drove her daughter Sheridan Hookimaw, 13, to her self-inflicted death in October 2015.

    ‘We want to see changes’: Family of Attawapiskat teen who died by suicide urges coroner’s inquest‘We want to see changes’: Family of Attawapiskat teen who died by suicide urges coroner’s inquest

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    Toronto police responded to a call near Islington Ave. and Dixon Rd. on Sunday night and found three men with injuries.

    Man shot dead in Etobicoke days after fatal shooting in the same areaMan shot dead in Etobicoke days after fatal shooting in the same area

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    At least 1,500 homes and businesses were destroyed while an estimated 20,000 people were sent on a headlong flight to safety through smoke and flames.

    ‘An inferno like you’ve never seen’ — wildfires sweep through California wine country‘An inferno like you’ve never seen’ — wildfires sweep through California wine country

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    Thousands of low-wage temporary farm workers from Mexico and the Caribbean have transformed Leamington.

    Leamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changedLeamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changedLeamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changedLeamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changedLeamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changedLeamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changedLeamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changedLeamington is at the frontlines of the boom in migrant workers. Here’s how it’s changed

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    Well-known Vancouver radio broadcaster Rafe Mair has died at the age of 85.

    Rafe Mair, former radio host and B.C. politician, dead at 85Rafe Mair, former radio host and B.C. politician, dead at 85

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    Sikhs long and arduous journey constitutes a great Canadian story.

    Pariahs to power brokers: Sikhs have become a major political force in CanadaPariahs to power brokers: Sikhs have become a major political force in Canada

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    “It's still surreal. It's like waking up from a nightmare into another dream — a more pleasant dream, but it's still a dream,” Wisdom said after 13 years in custody.

    Convicted in Galloway Boys shooting, Jason Wisdom is released from prison after his murder conviction is stayedConvicted in Galloway Boys shooting, Jason Wisdom is released from prison after his murder conviction is stayed

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    MIAMI—Two women who lived at a Florida nursing home that lost air conditioning during Hurricane Irma have died, bringing to 14 the number of fatalities linked to the home.

    Cecilia Franco, 90, and Francesca Andrade, 95, died from ailments suffered when the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills lost power Sept. 10 during the hurricane’s passage, Hollywood police spokeswoman Miranda Grossman told The Associated Press on Monday.

    On Sept. 13, eight residents died and other residents were evacuated from the sweltering facility after the electric transformer that powered the facility’s air conditioning was damaged during the storm. Grossman didn’t say exactly when the women died, but said police are treating the deaths as part of the criminal investigation.

    Read more:

    Florida suspends licence of nursing home where 9 died after Irma

    ‘Red flag’ calls signalled post-Irma deaths at Florida nursing home

    U.S. job slump from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma worse than expected

    The Miami Herald reports Franco’s husband Miguel Antonio Franco, who also had lived at the home, died Sept. 13.

    Even though the most recent deaths come nearly a month after the facility was evacuated, attorney Bill Dean, who is representing several of the surviving patients, said a good attorney will argue that the conditions immediately after the storm, as well as the evacuation, led to the deaths. He said the nursing home should be held responsible for any other deaths in the near future.

    “I think it’s tragic, I think it’s sad,” Dean said. “All of this was preventable by the nursing home.”

    No one has been charged, and police and prosecutors won’t say how long the wait could be if any criminal charges are brought.

    Some experts said they believe it would be difficult to prove anyone was criminally negligent, even though patients and their families may have solid civil cases.

    Dean said he’s concerned the patients might see little money in civil cases. He added that he’s worried that even if the 145 patients or their family members were to win lawsuits against the facility, there wouldn’t be enough money to pay the damages.

    “Ultimately those cases would be worth pennies on the dollar,” Dean said.

    The state suspended the home’s license almost immediately after the evacuation, and company officials later announced they were closing permanently. Last week, the facility let go of 245 workers, including doctors, nurses, therapists and others.

    A telephone message left with nursing home’s public relations company wasn’t immediately returned.


    Two more die from Florida nursing home that lost air conditioning during Hurricane IrmaTwo more die from Florida nursing home that lost air conditioning during Hurricane Irma

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    SEATTLE—Washington state said it is suing President Donald Trump over his decision to let more employers claiming religious or moral objections opt-out of providing no-cost birth control to women.

    State Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who successfully sued to block Trump’s initial travel ban early this year, announced his latest lawsuit on Monday, just three days after the new rules were issued.

    Read more: Donald Trump issues order to let employers refuse no-cost birth control coverage on moral or religious grounds

    Trump’s policy is designed to roll back parts of former president Barack Obama’s health care law, which required that most companies cover birth control as preventive care for women, at no additional cost.

    Ferguson says the administration’s actions violate the First Amendment, because it requires individuals to bear the burden of religions to which they don’t belong, and the equal protection requirements of the Fifth Amendment, because it applies to women but not men.


    Washington State sues Trump administration over new birth-control rulesWashington State sues Trump administration over new birth-control rules

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    Lawyers for two Liberals accused of bribery in a 2015 Sudbury byelection — including Premier Kathleen Wynne’s former deputy chief of staff — will be back in the northern Ontario city Tuesday to argue the case should be dropped.

    The unusual push for a directed verdict of not guilty by Judge Howard Borenstein comes two weeks after Crown attorneys finished laying out the prosecution and before any defence witnesses have been called.

    Defence counsel for Patricia Sorbara, also a key architect of Wynne’s 2014 election victory, and Sudbury Liberal organizer Gerry Lougheed say there’s no basis for the Election Act charges against the pair, who have pleaded not guilty.

    They are accused of offering jobs or posts to a would-be Liberal candidate to clear the way for Wynne’s preferred choice, defecting New Democrat MP Glenn Thibeault, now her energy minister.

    But the Election Act does not apply to the “private” internal process of nominating candidates for any political party — only to candidates in an election, lawyers Michael Lacy, Brian Greenspan and Erin Dann argue in a 44-page application to the Ontario Court of Justice.

    “Courts should not lightly direct verdicts of acquittal,” they acknowledged. “At the same time, trial judges have a gatekeeper function separate and apart from the state’s discretion to lay a charge.”

    Evidence shows Thibeault had already agreed to be the Liberal candidate before Lougheed and Sorbara were taped in conversations with offers to the would-be candidate, mortgage broker Andrew Olivier, the application says.

    Sorbara and Lougheed “could not have said anything that induced Mr. Olivier in respect of an event that was not going to happen.”

    Olivier had been the party’s Sudbury candidate in the 2014 provincial election but lost the riding — held for almost two decades by veteran Liberal MPP and cabinet minister Rick Bartolucci — to New Democrat city councillor Joe Cimino as Wynne gained a narrow majority across the province.

    The byelection was called after Cimino unexpectedly quit five months into his term for family reasons.

    “The premier appointed Mr. Thibeault. No nomination meeting was held. Neither Mr. Olivier, nor anyone else, was permitted to seek the OLP (Ontario Liberal Party) candidacy,” the defence team writes.

    “Mr. Olivier’s ‘wishful thinking’ that he would be able to persuade the premier to change her mind was a product of his own self-induced misconception.”

    Wynne testified at the trial that Olivier was “not as strong a candidate as I had thought” and that offers were made simply to keep him involved in the party.

    In its opening statement last month, the Crown maintained that the conversations recorded by Olivier with Sorbara and Lougheed on Dec. 11 and 12 of 2014 prove he was offered jobs and appointments to exit the nomination race.

    Wynne “did not think Andrew Olivier would win,” Crown attorney David McKercher said, suggesting the party was eager to nudge Olivier out smoothly to avoid any embarrassing public spectacle.

    The defence lawyers note in their application that Olivier subsequently ran in the byelection as an independent candidate. He lost, placing third behind Thibeault and an NDP challenger.

    Sorbara faces a second charge of bribing Thibeault to become the candidate by offering paid campaign jobs to two of his NDP office staff.

    Greenspan, representing Sorbara, said Thibeault testified she made no promise to provide paid positions “until after he decided to become the candidate.”

    “To put it bluntly, the idea that Ms. Sorbara induced Mr. Thibeault to leave his role as a federal MP by promising modest one-time stipends for two staffers, totalling less than $5,000, is fanciful.”

    Defence lawyers will make oral arguments in Sudbury on Tuesday and Wednesday, followed by the Crown. Crown attorney Rick Visca declined to release the prosecution’s written response to the defence application.

    It’s not known how long the judge will take to make a decision. If he rejects the application for a directed verdict of not guilty, the case will proceed with the defence calling its witnesses later this month.

    Political observers are watching the trial closely with a provincial election looming next June 7.

    If convicted, Sorbara and Lougheed could be fined up to $25,000 and sentenced to maximum jail sentences of two years less a day. The charges under the Election Act are in a lesser category than the Criminal Code.


    Defence lawyers for Liberals in Sudbury byelection trial ask judge to drop caseDefence lawyers for Liberals in Sudbury byelection trial ask judge to drop case

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    LAS VEGAS—The gunman who killed 58 people in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history targeted aviation fuel tanks, stockpiled his car with explosives and had personal protection gear as part of an escape plan, the Clark County sheriff said Monday.

    Sheriff Joe Lombardo said at a news conference that they still have not pinpointed the shooter’s motive behind his decision to fire on a concert crowd of 22,000 in Las Vegas on Oct. 1 from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel casino.

    There’s still no evidence Stephen Craig Paddock was motivated by ideology, and there’s no evidence there was another shooter, he said. Investigators have found 200 incidents of Paddock moving through the city, and at no time was he with anyone else, Lombardo said.

    They haven’t found any one particular event in Paddock’s life that triggered the shooting, he said. They didn’t find any note in his room, only a paper with numbers, he said.

    Lombardo also confirmed investigators are talking with Paddock’s brother Eric Paddock, who travelled to Las Vegas, and continue to speak with the shooter’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, to get insight.

    Lombardo declined to reveal what they’ve said, but stated, “Every piece of information we get is one more piece of the puzzle.”

    Friends and relatives of the victims and other concertgoers who survived returned Monday to reclaim baby strollers, shoes, phones, backpacks and purses left behind in the panic as they fled.

    The interviews with Paddock’s brother Saturday and Sunday were part of an exhaustive search through the 64-year-old’s life in search of clues about why he unleashed gunfire from broken windows in the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel casino.

    Read more:

    Golden Knights play it right in shattered Vegas: Cox

    Las Vegas airport became a safe haven in the chaos of the shooting

    ‘We hurt with you’: Jason Aldean opens ‘SNL’ with tribute to Las Vegas victims

    Eric Paddock declined to say what he was asked, but he said he’s co-operating with investigators, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He declined interview requests from The Associated Press.

    “I’m trying to get them to understand Steve’s mindset,” Eric Paddock told the newspaper. “I don’t want them to chase bad leads.”

    In a newly revealed court document obtained by CNN, Stephen Paddock described himself as a nocturnal creature who bet up to $1 million each night while gambling at Las Vegas casinos in flip-flops and sweat pants, catching sleep in the day. The description of his lifestyle comes from a deposition filed as part of a civil lawsuit he filed against Cosmopolitan Hotel, where he slipped and fell in 2011.

    Personal effects being recovered were strewn across the massive grassy concert venue where 22,000 country music fans attended the Route 91 Harvest festival have become sentimental memories of loved ones for some, and haunting reminders of the night of terror for others.

    People left behind thousands of lawn chairs, hats, wallets, souvenirs, cellphones, purses, boots and several other items, Clark County Emergency Manager John Steinbeck said.

    People are being allowed to come retrieve their things in groups based on where they were seated, with authorities expanding the offer Monday to include people who were seated west of the stage, he said. As of Monday morning, 99 people who were seated east of the stage or in a VIP tent had sought to recover their belongings.

    Authorities are powering up cellphones and asking people to text their full names to the phones to ensure they are returned to the correct owners.

    Some of the victims have already been returned home and been memorialized at funerals while many others were in route on Monday ahead of services planned for later dates.

    More than 800 people packed into a California church on Saturday to honour the life of Jack Beaton, who died shielding his wife from gunfire. A white hearse carrying the casket of Christopher Roybal, a veteran who served combat during four tours in the Middle East, was led by a procession of motorcycles to McCarran International Airport for a short flight to Southern California.

    Eric Paddock said he came to Las Vegas to retrieve his brother’s body in hopes of sending the cremated ashes to their 89-year-old mother in Orlando.

    Clark County Coroner John Fudenberg said Monday he could not discuss the results of an autopsy done on Stephen Paddock, who police said shot himself dead before officers arrived at the Las Vegas Strip hotel suite from which he rained gunfire on a concert crowd below.

    The coroner didn’t say when Paddock’s body would be released to his family or how long it will be before autopsy results are made public.

    Eric Paddock told the Review-Journal that he plans to put his brother’s assets in a trust that would benefit the shooting victims. He has described his brother as a multimillionaire who considered himself a professional gambler and owned real estate.

    The family of one of the victims, 56-year-old John Phippen of Santa Clarita, California, has already asked a Nevada judge to appoint a special administrator to take control of the gunman’s assets. The attorneys said that’s a necessary step to allow lawsuits to be brought against Paddock’s estate.

    Late Sunday night, when exactly a week has passed since the shooting, casino marquees and other lights on the Las Vegas Strip went dark for about 10 minutes to pay tribute to the victims who spent that much time under fire.

    Meanwhile, the makeshift SWAT team of police officers who made it to Paddock’s door at the Mandalay Bay hotel casino 12 minutes after the first shots were fired described how they got there and the “gun store” they found inside his room in an appearance on the CBS television program “60 Minutes” on Sunday night.

    Officer Dave Newton said they found “so many guns. So many magazines. Stacks and stacks of magazines everywhere. Just in suitcases all neatly stacked against pillars, around the room, all stacked up, rifles placed all throughout. All kinds of monitors and electrical equipment he had in there. It just looked like almost a gun store.”

    Also on Sunday, federal investigators returned to do another search of Paddock’s three-bedroom house on a cul-de-sac in a retirement community in Mesquite, Nevada. The home was first searched Monday by Las Vegas police, who said they found 19 guns and several pounds of potentially explosive materials at the house that Paddock bought in early 2015.


    Las Vegas gunman aimed at fuel tanks, had protective gear as part of escape plan, sheriff saysLas Vegas gunman aimed at fuel tanks, had protective gear as part of escape plan, sheriff says

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    LUBBOCK, TEXAS—Police apprehended a 19-year-old student accused of fatally shooting a Texas Tech University police officer at the campus police station Monday night.

    University officials issued an alert saying the suspect was arrested and that the campus lockdown order had been lifted.

    In an earlier statement, the university identified the suspect as Hollis Daniels.

    University spokesperson Chris Cook said that campus police made a student welfare check Monday evening and — upon entering the room — found evidence of drugs and drug paraphernalia. Officers then brought the suspect to the police station for standard debriefing.

    While at the station, Cook said the suspect pulled out a gun and shot an officer in the head, killing him. The suspect then fled on foot before being apprehended a short time later.

    Texas Tech officials initially issued a lockdown alert to students on social media, urging those on campus “to take shelter in a safe location.”

    Additional information was not immediately available.

    Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued a statement about the shooting late Monday, saying “hearts go out to the family of the police officer killed.” Abbott also said he had mobilized state law enforcement resources to aid in the investigation.


    Campus police officer shot and killed at Texas Tech University; suspect caughtCampus police officer shot and killed at Texas Tech University; suspect caught

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